Physicians' willingness to be vaccinated with a smallpox vaccine to prevent monkeypox viral infection: A cross-sectional study in Indonesia

Harapan, Harapan and Setiawan, Abdul Malik and Yufika, Amanda and Anwar, Samsul and Wahyuni, Sri and Asrizal, Febrivan W. and Sufri, Muhammad R. and Putra, Reza P. and Wijayanti, Nanda P. and Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi and Maulana, Razi and Khusna, Afriyani and Nusrina, Ina and Shidiq, Muhammad and Fitriani, Devi and Muharrir, Muharrir and Husna, Cut A. and Yusri, Fitria and Maulana, Reza and Itoh, Naoya and Andalas, Mohd and Wagner, Abram L. and Mudatsir, Mudatsir (2020) Physicians' willingness to be vaccinated with a smallpox vaccine to prevent monkeypox viral infection: A cross-sectional study in Indonesia. Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health, 8 (4). pp. 1259-1263.

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Full text available at: https://doi.org/10.1016%2Fj.cegh.2020.04.024

Abstract

Background
Although there is no licensed vaccine for monkeypox, smallpox vaccine has been shown to be 85% effective in preventing the monkeypox. This study was conducted to assess the willingness of frontline healthcare providers to be vaccinated with smallpox vaccine to prevent monkeypox.

Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Indonesia. The willingness was assessed under two scenarios: fully subsidized and non-subsidized vaccine. Explanatory variables such as sociodemographic profile, workplace and professional characteristics, and knowledge of monkeypox were collected. A logistic regression assessed the influence of these explanatory variables on participants’ willingness.

Results
Out of 510 received participants’ responses, 407 (79.8%) were analyzed. With a fully subsidized vaccine scenario, 381 (93.6%) of the participants were willing to be vaccinated and in an unadjusted analysis, gender, education, monthly income, and type of workplace were associated with willingness. With a non-subsidized vaccine (i.e. the vaccine price was US$ 17.9), the proportion who were willing to be vaccinated decreased to 71.9%. In adjusted analyses for both scenarios, gender was the only independent predictor for willingness; men were less willing to be vaccinated than women, adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.37; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.87 and aOR: 0.42; 95%CI: 0.27, 0.67, respectively for subsidized and non-subsidized scenario.

Conclusion
Vaccine price and gender are important factors for physicians' willingness to be vaccinated for smallpox vaccine prevent monkeypox in Indonesia. These findings indicate that achieving high vaccine converge may require partially or fully subsidized vaccines, along with a clear guideline and recommendation from authorities.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Monkeypox, Monkeypox vaccine, Healthcare provider, Willingness to be vaccinated, Vaccine acceptance
Subjects: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Divisions: Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences > Department of Medical Education
Depositing User: dr. Abdul Malik Setiawan
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2021 09:08

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