Contesting the nativelikeness norms of productive skill assessment in the peripheral ELT practice: ELF and world englishes perspectives

Huda, Miftahul ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0196-9262 and Irham, Irham ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9222-230X (2023) Contesting the nativelikeness norms of productive skill assessment in the peripheral ELT practice: ELF and world englishes perspectives. MEXTESOL Journal, 47 (2). pp. 1-9. ISSN 2395-9908

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Abstract

Soon after Kachru (1992) promoted the notion of the World of English(es) through his ‘inner-outer-expanding circle’ principle, academic audiences started to recognize that the number of English nonnative speakers had noticeably surpassed that of native speakers. Such a phenomenon has encouraged English learners of diverse lingua-cultural backgrounds, particularly those of outer and expanding circles, to acquire the 'standard' English skill proficiency set by the inner circle group. However, their different accents, for example, are often deemed as a deviation of ‘standard’ English, that is strange, foreign, or non-standard. A universal recognition of a trend to World Englishes is paradoxically not followed by practitioners' pedagogical breakthroughs to devalue the 'nativelikeness' norms in assessing learners’ oral and written proficiencies. Many scoring rubrics for speaking skill assessment still consider mother-tongue accent as an interfering factor that hinders oral accuracy. Furthermore, students’ writing is often assessed based on taken-for-granted nativelikeness norms: linearity, relevance, and logically articulated. This paper, therefore, aims to provide a critical review upon productive skill assessments by contesting conventional concepts of ‘accuracy’ and considering an alternative assessment that is more World English(es)-friendly as well as to revisit old norms of academic writing assessment imposed to multilingual English learners by voicing out current insights from English as a lingua franca and World Englishes perspectives.

Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: world Englishes; lingua franca; speaking skill; scoring rubrics; nativeness norms
Subjects: 13 EDUCATION > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130207 LOTE, ESL and TESOL Curriculum and Pedagogy
20 LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE > 2003 Language Studies > 200302 English Language
20 LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE > 2003 Language Studies > 200303 English as a Second Language
Divisions: Faculty of Humanities > Department of English Language and Letters
Depositing User: Miftahul Huda
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2023 13:23

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